Cum for your skin – ‘yes’ or ‘nah’

The seminal fluid released by the penis during ejaculation is known as sperm. While semen may include skin-beneficial compounds, the modest amount of these ingredients is unlikely to be of much use. Putting sperm on the skin or ingesting it increases the risk of allergic reactions and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

The assumption that semen may be favorable to skin wellness is built mostly on anecdotal evidence suggesting that the nutrients present in semen may enhance skin health. Even though semen contains nutrients that are good for the skin, there is little scientific evidence to suggest that applying semen to the skin or consuming it can improve skin health and appearance.

What are the nutrients in seminal fluid that is considered to be beneficial for skin?

Here are some of the nutrients/ properties found in semen:

The type of protein found in semen is also known as collagen! Collagen is infamously known in the beauty industry to improve skin hydration as well as skin elasticity, improving skin texture by making it look soft and supple.

Zinc is said to possess antioxidant properties that may be able to aid in the prevention of skin damage from exposure to UV rays.

According to an older study, bathing in a magnesium-rich sea salt solution may treat dry skin by reducing inflammation and boosting moisture.

Urea is a waste product that comes from the breakdown of proteins’ amino acids.

It is reported that products which contain low doses of urea can help in hydrating, exfoliating, and help the absorption of other skin-care products. (shudders in disgust)

(It’s important to keep in mind that semen only contains small amounts of these nutrients, thus applying them to the skin is unlikely to provide any benefits.)

Does semen help with acne?

Some claim that semen can aid in the treatment and improvement of acne. This is based on the assumption that spermine – an organic molecule found in sperm and cells throughout the human body – possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that can combat blemishes. Again, there’s really no scientific evidence to back up the usage of sperm as an acne remedy. It is still advised to seek proper consultation from a dermatologist if you are facing any acne problems.

Does semen help with anti-aging?

Spermidine, a chemical found in sperm, which is also responsible for the smell of semen. When spermidine is secreted from streptococcus bacteria, it is said to be able to contribute to skin recovery by stimulating collagen synthesis which can smooth fine lines. The amount of spermidine in sperm is probably insufficient to help with anti-aging. Instead of semen, there are many foods that have high levels of spermidine, for instance, citrus fruits and green peppers, so it’s probably best if you consume those instead of semen.

Why you shouldn’t DIY

By passing via mucous membranes in the lips, nostrils, and eyes, sperm can transmit infections to another individual. Putting sperm on the skin puts a person at risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as chlamydia, gonorrhoea, or herpes. Our eyes are particularly vulnerable, for instance, ocular herpes can cause inflammation and also vision loss. Besides that, when a person is exposed to sperm, he or she may develop an allergic reaction. A person who is having an allergic reaction to semen may experience itching, swelling, hives, and even anaphylactic shock.

There is a risk of skin irritation when using semen on the skin, just as there is with any other substance that a person would use on their skin. While further scientific research is needed, the majority of existing studies reveals that semen has no benefits to the skin. Furthermore, the properties that may be beneficial are commonly found in food or skincare products (so it’s probably best if you stick to what has been proven instead). By passing via mucous membranes in the lips, nostrils, and eyes, sperm can transmit infections to another individual. Putting sperm on the skin puts a person at risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as chlamydia, herpes, and ocular herpes. HPV vaccination must be administered.

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